feedback
Enter marine-related query and AI bot will look for best match in our DB.
 

Ship equipped with cells into which containers can be stacked; containerships may be full or partial, depending on whether all or only some of its holds are fitted with container cells.



Related Terms

CELLS

Compartments of a container ship into which containers fit.

PORT OF REFUGE

Port, not on a ship's itinerary, which the ship calls at due to some unforeseen hazard at sea and where the ship may undergo repairs, refuel, or rescue cargo.

HEAVY LIFT CHARGE

A charge typically imposed when special lifting gear is required to handle a given piece of cargo, which may be of either heavy weight or of large dimensions (often referred to as 'out of gauge' when dealing with container vessels).

CUT-OFF TIME

The latest time a container may be delivered to a terminal for loading to a scheduled barge, vessel, train, or truck.

CSI

Container Security Initiative - a U.S. cargo security program whereby containerized cargoes destined for the United States may be inspected on a selective basis at many foreign ports before loading on a vessel. As of October 2007, there were 51 approved ports. A multinational program, aligned with the President's 'Strategy for Homeland Security', that extends the United States' zone of security by prescreening containers that pose a potential security risk before they leave foreign ports for U.S. seaports.

CLOSING TIME

The latest time a container may be delivered to a terminal for loading to a scheduled barge, vessel, train, or truck.

TWENTY-FOOT EQUIVALENT UNIT

Container size standard of twenty feet. Two twenty-foot containers (TEUs) equal one FEU. Container vessel capacity and port throughput capacity are frequently referred to in TEUs.

FEEDER

A grain container or reservoir constructed around the hatchway between two decks of a ship which when filled with grain automatically feeds or fills in the vacant areas in the lower holds.

TIME CHARTERER

The charterer has the use of the ship for a specific trip or a period of time during which he may employ her for his own account. He may direct her within the trading limits agreed in the charter-party and, in normal circumstances, the Master must obey these orders. While the time charterer has the commercial control, the owner retains responsibility for the vessel and the Master and crew remain in his employment. The hire, usually calculated per day or per deadweight metric or long ton, is paid in advance at regular, agreed intervals, normally semi-monthly or monthly. Normally, the charterer pays for the fuel on board at the time he accepts delivery and for fuel supplied while the vessel is on hire. When he hands the vessel back to the owner, the owner pays for what remains on board. The prices applicable on delivery and redelivery are the agreed bunker prices in the charter. The owner pays for the running costs of the vessel. If the ship breaks down or, as a result of the shipowner's fault, the charterer does not have the use of the vessel, the vessel goes 'off-hire' for that period subject to any terms in the charter-party. Time charterers may be owners who want to temporarily augment their own fleet; charterers who have a variety of commitments to meet; charterers who believe long-term chartering will hedge the market; operators who see a profit by taking voyage contracts from charterers and time chartering vessels themselves to cover those contracts. Where a time charterer issues and signs his own bill of lading, he may be held to be a 'carrier' for the purposes of the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971.

CONSOLIDATION

Cargo consisting of shipments of two or more shippers or suppliers. Container load shipments may be consolidated for one or more consignees.

Related questions

MarineProHelp 2018 - 2020

First time here? Check out the FAQ!

If you've arrived to new location and wonder how to dress comfortably according to weather, check Comfiesto

×