Railcars grouped in a train by destination so that segments (blocks) can be uncoupled and routed to different destinations as the train moves through various junctions. Eliminates the need to break up a train and sort individual railcars at each junction.



Related Terms

UNIT TRAIN

A train of a specified number of railcars, perhaps 100, which remain as a unit for a designated destination or until a change in routing is made.

DESTINATION

Port which a vessel is bound for

TRAINING SHIP

A ship used to train students as sailors, especially a ship employed by a navy or coast guard to train future officers. The term refers both to ships used for training at sea and to old, immobile hulks used to house classrooms.

FAILURE

A rupture, break, or disintegration of a material or part of a system.

CARGO SHIP

Any sort of ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another, including general cargo ships (designed to carry break bulk cargo), bulk carriers, container ships, multipurpose vessels, and tankers. Tankers, however, although technically cargo ships, are routinely thought of as constituting a completely separate category.

LOOSE CANNON

An irresponsible and reckless individual whose behavior (either intended or unintended) endangers the group he or she belongs to. A loose cannon, weighing thousands of pounds, would crush anything and anyone in its path, and possibly even break a hole in the hull, thus endangering the seaworthiness of the whole ship.

ANTI-FOAM AGENT

Additive used to reduce foaming in petroleum products: silicone oil to break up large surface bubbles, and various kinds of polymers that decrease the amount of small bubbles entrained in the oils.

LCL

A consignment of cargo which is insufficient to fill a shipping container. It is grouped with other consignments for the same destination in a container at a container freight station.

BILL OF LADING

A document by which the Master of a ship acknowledges having received in good order and condition (or the reverse) certain specified goods consigned to him by some particular shipper, and binds himself to deliver them in similar condition, unless the perils of the sea, fire or enemies prevent him, to the consignees of the shippers at the point of destination on their paying him the stipulated freight. A bill of lading specifies the name of the master, the port and destination of the ship the goods, the consignee, and the rate of freight.

TENSILE STRENGTH

The maximum amount of pull that a material will withstand before breaking. it is expressed as the number of pounds per square inch of pull that is required to break a bar having a cross section of one square inch.

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