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When a container or vessel has reached its volumetric capacity before its permitted weight limit.



Related Terms

TWENTY FOOT EQUIVALENT UNIT

A unit of measurement equal to the space occupied by a standard twenty foot container. Used in stating the capacity of container vessel or storage area. One 40 ft. Container is equal to two TEU's.

TWENTY-FOOT EQUIVALENT UNIT

Container size standard of twenty feet. Two twenty-foot containers (TEUs) equal one FEU. Container vessel capacity and port throughput capacity are frequently referred to in TEUs.

TEU

A unit of measurement equal to the space occupied by a standard twenty foot container. Used in stating the capacity of container vessel or storage area. One 40 ft. Container is equal to two TEU's.

FULL SHIPLOAD LOT

The amount of cargo a vessel carries or is able to carry. Practically, it is the amount of cargo which induces the specific voyage. While the cargo lot may take up the majority of the vessel's space or tonnage capacity, it does not require a vessel's volume and weight capacity to be fully utilized.

CONTAINER TERMINAL

A specialized facility where ocean container vessels dock to discharge and load containers, equipped with cranes with a safe lifting capacity of 35-40 tons, with booms having an outreach of up to 120 feet in order to reach the outside cells of vessels. Most such cranes operate on rail tracks and have articulating rail trucks on each of their four legs, enabling them to traverse along the terminal and work various bays on the vessel and for more than one crane to work a single vessel simultaneously. Most terminals have direct rail access and container storage areas, and are served by highway carriers.

DWAT

A common measure of ship carrying capacity. The number of tons (2240 lbs.) of cargo, stores and bunkers that a vessel can transport. It is the difference between the number of tons of water a vessel displaces 'light' and the number of tons it displaces 'when submerged to the 'deep load line'.' A vessel's cargo capacity is less than its total deadweight tonnage. The difference in weight between a vessel when it is fully loaded and when it is empty (in general transportation terms, the net) measured by the water it displaces. This is the most common, and useful, measurement for shipping as it measures cargo capacity.

HANDY MAX

A dry bulk vessel size class of 35000-50000 tons DWT. They are popular for their nearly universal capability and flexibility of carrying capacity and shallow draft (less than 12 meters or 39 feet).

DWCC

Vessel carrying capacity viz. fuel, water, crew based on 224O lbs per deadweight ton

DRUM

A container with a capacity of 55 U.S. gallons.

DEADWEIGHT

The total weight in tons (2240 lb.) that a ship carries on a specified draft including fuel, water in tanks, cargo, stores, passengers, baggage, crew and their effects, but excluding the water in the boilers. It is the difference in weight between a vessel when it is fully loaded and when it is empty measured by the water it displaces.

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