The fundamental temperature scale with its zero at absolute zero and expressed in degrees Kelvin. One degree Kelvin is equal to one degree Celsius or one degree Centigrade. For the purpose of practical calculations in order to convert Celsius to Kelvin add 273. It is normal for the degree Kelvin to be abbreviated in mathematical formulae to ‘K’ with the degree symbol being omitted.



Related Terms

CELSIUS TEMPERATURE SCALE

Temperature scale of 0o (freezing water) to 100o (boiling water). Celsius = (Fahrenheit - 32) x 5/9.

CELSIUS

A temperature scale with gradients between the freezing and boiling points of water are divided into 100 equal parts.

CURLE SCALE OF TEMPERATURE

A temperature scale based on the susceptibility of a paramagnetic substance, assuming that it obeys Curie's law; used at temperatures below about 1 kelvin.

MONOCHROMATIC TEMPERATURE SCALE

A temperature scale based upon the amount of power radiated from a blackbody at a single wavelength.

ABSOLUTE TEMPERATURE SCALE

A scale of temperature measurement in which zero degrees is absolute zero.

SALR

Saturated Adiabatic Lapse Rate; the rate at which the temperature of water vapour saturated air changes as it ascends or descends. It is taken as 1.5 degree Celsius per 1000ft.

FAHRENHEIT TEMPERATURE

Temperature based on a scale in which, under standard atmospheric pressure

MAWP

The maximum pressure permissible at the top of the vessel in its normal operating position, at the operating temperature specified for that pressure.

BRITTLE TEMPERATURE

The temperature point below which a material, especially metal, is brittle; that is, the critical normal stress for fracture is reached before the critical shear stress for plastic deformation.

EQUIVISCOUS TEMPERATURE

A measure of viscosity used in the tar industry, equal to the temperature in degrees Celsius at which the viscosity of tar is 50 seconds as measured in a standard tar efflux viscometer. Abbreviated EVT.

Related questions

MarineProHelp 2018 - 2019.

First time here? Check out the FAQ!

×