Carriage whereby the place of departure and any place of landing are situated in more than one country.


Related Terms

OTTO-LARDILLON METHOD

A method of computing trajectories of missiles with low velocities (so that drag is proportional to the velocity squared) and quadrant angles of departure that may be high, in which exact solutions of the equations of motion are arrived at by numerical integration and are then tabulated.

INEQUALITY

A systematic departure from the mean value of a tidal quantity. inert

INSTABILITY

The state or property of submitting to change or of tending to increase the departure from original conditions after being disturbed.

DEMURRAGE

A delay of vessel's departure or loading with cargo

INVERSION

In meteorology, a departure from the usual decrease or increase with altitude of the value of an atmospheric property. This term is almost always used to refer to a temperature inversion, an atmospheric condition in which the temperature increases with increasing altitude.

ANOMALY

1. Departure from the strict characteristics of the type, pattern, scheme, etc. 2. An angle used in the mathematical description of the orbit of one body about another. It is the angle between the radius vector of the body and the line of apsides and is measured from pericenter in the direction of motion. When the radius vector is from the center of the primary to the orbiting body, the angle is called true anomaly. When the radius vector is from the center of the primary to a fictitious body moving with a uniform angular velocity in such a way that its period is equal to that of the actual body, the angle is called mean anomaly. When the radius vector is from the center of the elliptical orbit to the point of intersection of the circle defined by the semimajor axis with the line perpendicular to the semimajor axis and passing through the orbiting body, the angle is called eccentric anomaly or eccentric angle. 3. Departure of the local mean value of a meteorological element from the mean value for the latitude.

NAVAL VESSEL LIGHTS ACT

Authorized departure from the rules of the road for character and position of navigation lights for certain naval ships. Such modifications are published in Notice to Mariners.

NAVIGATIONAL TRIANGLE

The spherical triangle solved in computing altitude and azimuth and great circle sailing problems. The celestial triangle is formed on the celestial sphere by the great circles connecting the elevated pole, zenith of the assumed position of the observer, and a celestial body. The terrestrial triangle is formed on the earth by the great circles connecting the pole and two places on the earth; the assumed position of the observer and geographical position of the body for celestial observations, and the point of departure and destination for great circle sailing problems. The expression astronomical triangle applies to either the celestial or terrestrial triangle used for solving celestial observations.

COMPOSITE SAILING

A modification of great-circle sailing used when it is desired to limit the highest latitude. The composite track consists of a great circle from the point of departure and tangent to the limiting parallel, a course line along the parallel, and a great circle tangent to the limiting parallel to the destination. Composite sailing applies only when the vertex lies between the point of departure and destination.

COMPOSITE TRACK

A modified great-circle track consisting of an initial great circle track from the point of departure with its vertex on a limiting parallel of latitude, a parallel-sailing track from this vertex along the limiting parallel to the vertex of a final great-circle track to the destination.

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