A term used interchangeably with viscosity to distinguish it from either kinematic viscosity or commercial viscosity. Absolute viscosity is the ratio of shear stress to shear rate. It is a fluid's internal resistance to flow. The common unit of absolute viscosity is the poise. Absolute viscosity divided by fluid density equals kinematic viscosity. It is occasionally referred to as dynamic viscosity. Absolute viscosity and kinematic viscosity are expressed in fundamental units. Commercial viscosity such as Saybolt viscosity is expressed in arbitrary units of time, usually seconds.



Related Terms

POISE

A measure of viscosity (absolute viscosity) numerically equal to the force required to move a plane surface of one square centimeter per second when the surfaces are separated by a layer of fluid one centimeter in thickness. It is the ratio of the shearing stress to the shear rate of a fluid and is expressed in dyne seconds per square centimeter (DYNE SEC/CM2); 1 centipoise equals .01 poise.

PUMPABILITY

The low temperature, low shear stress-shear rate viscosity characteristics of an fluid that permit satisfactory flow.

VISCOSITY

Measurement of a fluid's resistance to flow. The common metric unit of absolute viscosity is the poise, which is defined as the force in dynes required to move a surface one square centimeter in area past a parallel surface at a speed of one centimeter per second, with the surfaces separated by a fluid film one centimeter thick. In addition to kinematic viscosity, there are other methods for determining viscosity, including Saybolt Universal Viscosity (SUV), Saybolt Furol viscosity, Engier viscosity, and Redwood viscosity. Since viscosity varies in inversely with temperature, its value is meaningless until the temperature at which it is determined is reported.

SHEAR STRESS

Frictional force overcome in sliding one layer of fluid along another, as in any fluid flow. The shear stress of a petroleum oil or other Newtonian fluid at a given temperature varies directly with shear rate (velocity). The ratio between shear stress and shear rate is constant; this ratio is termed viscosity of a Newtonian fluid, the greater the shear stress as a function of rate of shear. In a non-Newtonian fluid, such as a grease or a polymer-containing oil (e.g. multi-grade oil) - shear stress is not proportional to the rate of shear. A non-Newtonian fluid may be said to have an apparent viscosity, a viscosity that holds only for the shear rate (and temperature) at which the viscosity is determined.

STOKE (St)

Kinematic measurement of a fluid resistance to flow defined by the ratio of the fluid's dynamic viscosity to its density.

NEWTONIAN FLUID

A fluid with a constant viscosity at a given temperature regardless of the rate of shear. Single-grade oils are Newtonian fluids. Multigrade oils are NON-Newtonian fluids because viscosity varies with shear rate.

KINEMATIC VISCOSITY

The time required for a fixed amount of an oil to flow through a capillary tube under the force of gravity. The unit of kinematic viscosity is the stoke or centistoke (1/100 of a stoke). Kinematic viscosity may be defined as the quotient of the absolute viscosity in centipoises divided by the specific gravity of a fluid, both at the same temperature Centipoises / Specific Gravity = Centistokes .

DISPLACER-TYPE METER

Apparatus to detect liquid level or gas density by measuring the effect of the fluid (gas or liquid) on the buoyancy of a displacer unit immersed within the fluid.

S.U.S.

Saybolt Universal Second. Unit of oils viscosity. The time required for a fixed volume of oil to flow through a tube of a definite diameter at constant temperature.

BALANCED ARMATURE UNIT

Driving unit used in magnetic loudspeakers, consisting of an iron armature pivoted between the poles stair flight. ing winder. A valve having equal fluid pressure in both the opening and closing directions.

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