1. Cleaning materials by a blast of air that blows small abrasive particles against the surface. 2. The act of detonating an explosive.


Related Terms

DRY BLAST CLEANING

Cleaning of metallic surfaces by blasting with abrasive material traveling at a high velocity; abrasive may be accelerated by an air nozzle or a centrifugal wheel.

GRAVITY BED

A moving body of solids in which particles (granules, pellets, beads, or briquets) flow downward by gravity through a vessel, while process fluid flows upward; the moving-bed technique is used in blast and shaft furnaces, petroleum catalytic cracking, pellet dryers, and coolers.

CLAY REGENERATION

Cleaning coarse-grained absorbent clays for reuse in percolation processes by deoiling them with naphtha, steaming out excess naphtha, and roasting in a stream of air to remove carbonaceous matter.

BLAST BURNER

A burner in which a controlled burst of air or oxygen under pressure is supplied to the illuminating gas used. Also known as blast lamp.

DIOCTYL PHTHALATE TEST

A method used to evaluate air filters to be used in critical air-cleaning applications; a light-scattering technique counts the number of particles of controlled size (0.3 micrometer) entering and emerging from the test filter. Abbreviated DOP test.

BAG FILTER

A device containing one or more cloth bags for recovering particles from dust laden gas or air which is blown through it.

FIRN

Old snow which has recrystallized into a dense material. Unlike snow, the particles are to some extent joined together; but, unlike ice, the air spaces in it still connect with each other

ABRASIVE BLASTING

The cleaning or finishing of surfaces by the use of an abrasive entrained in a blast of air.

SOOT BLOWER

A tube from which jets of steam or compressed air are blown for cleaning the fireside of tubes or other parts of the boiler.

STEAM FOG

Fog formed when water vapor is added to air which is much colder than the source of the vapor. It may be formed when very cold air drifts across relatively warm water. At temperatures below about-20°F, ice particles or droxtals may be formed in the air producing a type of ice fog known as frost smoke.

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