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Also called asphalt or tar, bitumen is the brown or black viscous residue from the vacuum distillation of crude petroleum. It also occurs in nature as asphalt 'lakes' and 'tar sands'. It consists of high molecular weight hydrocarbons and minor amounts of sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

Related Terms

COMPOUND

(1) chemically speaking, a distinct substance formed by the combination of two or more elements in definite proportions by weight and possessing physical and chemical properties different from those of the combining elements. (2) in petroleum processing, generally connotes fatty oils and similar materials foreign to petroleum added to lubricants to impart special properties.

CONTAMINANT CAPACITY

The weight of a specified artificial contaminant that must be added to the influent to produce a given differential pressure across a filter at specified conditions. Used as an indication of relative service life. Also known as Dirt capacity, Dust capacity

DIELECTRIC STRENGTH

A measure of the ability of an insulating material to withstand electric stress (voltage) without failure. Fluids with high dielectric strength (usually expressed in volts or kilovolts) are good electrical insulators. (ASTM Designation D 877.)

CARBON RESIDUE

Coked material remaining after an oil has been exposed to high temperatures under controlled conditions.

CAPACITY PLAN

A plan outlining the spaces available for fuel, cargo, ballast, fresh water, etc, with guides on weight and volume for spaces at various drafts and displacements

REFRIGERATOR

A device to transfer heat from a low temperature to a high temperature medium.

ADSORPTION

Adhesion of the molecules of gases, liquids, or dissolved substances to a solid surface, resulting in relatively high concentration of the molecules at the place of contact; e.g. the plating out of an anti-wear additive on metal surfaces.

DERRICK

A device for hoisting and lowering heavy weights, cargo, stores, etc

HALF-TIDE BASIN

A lock of very large size and usually of irregular shape, the gates of which are kept open for several hours after high tide so that vessels may enter as long as there is sufficient depth over the sill. Vessels remain in the half-tide basin until the ensuing flood tide before they may pass through the gate to the inner harbor. If entry to the inner harbor is required before this time, water must be admitted to the half-tide basin from some external source.

HIGH WATER INEQUALITY

The difference between the heights of the two high waters during a tidal day
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