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The weight of a motor vehicle plus fuel and other components or equipment necessary for standard operation; does not include driver weight or payload.

Related Terms

SAFETY CONTROL

Device to stop unit, equipment or system if unsafe pressure and/or temperatures and/or dangerous conditions are reached.

ANTISTATIC ADDITIVE

An additive that increases the conductivity of a hydrocarbon fuel to hasten the dissipation of electrostatic charges during high-speed dispensing, thereby reducing the fire/ explosion hazard.

CLOUD POINT

The temperature at which waxy crystals in an oil or fuel form a cloudy appearance.

CAPACITY PLAN

A plan outlining the spaces available for fuel, cargo, ballast, fresh water, etc, with guides on weight and volume for spaces at various drafts and displacements

EMISSION SPECTROMETER

Works on the basis that atoms of metallic and other particular elements emit light at characteristic wavelengths when they are excited in a flame, arc, or spark. Excited light is directed through an entrance slit in the spectrometer. This light penetrates the slit, falls on a grate, and is dispersed and reflected. The spectrometer is calibrated by a series of standard samples containing known amounts of the elements of interest. By exciting these standard samples, an analytical curve can be established which gives the relationship between the light intensity and its concentration in the fluid.

RUNNING TIME

Amount of time an unit, equipment or system is run per hour or per 24 hours.

GASOHOL

A blend of 10% anhydrous ethanol (ethyl alcohol) and 90% gasoline, by volume. Used as a motor fuel.

FABRICATION INTEGRITY POINT

The differential gas pressure at which the first stream of gas bubbles are emitted from a wetted filter element under standard test conditions.

BLOW-BY

Passage of unburned fuel and combustion gases past the piston rings of internal combustion engines, resulting in fuel dilution and contamination of the crankcase oil.

CATALYTIC CONVERTER

An integral part of vehicle emission control systems since 1975. Oxidizing converters remove hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) from exhaust gases, while reducing converters control nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. Both use noble metal (platinum, palladium or rhodium) catalysts that can be 'poisoned' by lead compounds in the fuel or lubricant.
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