Having no night watches.


Related Terms

LOOKOUT TOWER

In marine operations, any tower surmounted by a small house in which a watch is habitually kept, as distinguished from an observation tower in which no watch is kept.

ISOCHRONISM

The property of having a uniform rate of operation or periodicity, for example, of a pendulum or watch balance.

DOGWATCH

A short, evening period of watch duty on a ship

HACK

A chronometer which has failed to meet the exacting require- ments of a standard chronometer, and is used for timing observations of celestial bodies, regulating ship's clocks, etc. A comparing watch, which may be of high quality, is normally used for timing celestial observations, the watch being compared with the chronometer, preferably both before and after observations. Sometimes called HACK CHRONOMETER.

GUARD BOAT

A boat which makes the rounds of a fleet at anchor to see that due watch is kept at night.

STARBOLINS

Sailors of the starboard watch

UNDER THE WEATHER

Serving a watch on the weather side of the ship, exposed to wind and spray.

BINNACLE LIST

A ship's sick list. The list of men unable to report for duty was given to the officer or mate of the watch by the ship's surgeon. The list was kept at the binnacle.

ANCHOR WATCH

The crewmen assigned to take care of the ship while anchored or moored, charged with such duties as making sure that the anchor is holding and the vessel is not drifting. Most marine GPS units have an Anchor Watch alarm capability.

IDLER

A member of a ship's company not required to serve watches. These were in general specialist tradesmen such as the carpenter and the sailmaker.

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