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DWT

Deadweight tons.

Related Terms

NET TONNAGE

Net tonnage is the gross tonnage less certain additional spaces such as crew and officer spaces, chart room, and a percentage of the propelling machinery spaces; also see deadweight, displacement, light and displacement, loaded

DWAT

A common measure of ship carrying capacity. The number of tons (2240 lbs.) of cargo, stores and bunkers that a vessel can transport. It is the difference between the number of tons of water a vessel displaces 'light' and the number of tons it displaces 'when submerged to the 'deep load line'.' A vessel's cargo capacity is less than its total deadweight tonnage. The difference in weight between a vessel when it is fully loaded and when it is empty (in general transportation terms, the net) measured by the water it displaces. This is the most common, and useful, measurement for shipping as it measures cargo capacity.

DEADWEIGHT TONNAGE

It is the difference in displacement in tonnes between the light and loaded conditions. The size of tankers is often given in terms of deadweight tonnage. Ships are usually chartered on the deadweight tonnage.

D.W.T.

Deadweight. The weight of cargo, stores and water.

DWCC

Vessel carrying capacity viz. fuel, water, crew based on 224O lbs per deadweight ton

AFRAMAX TANKER

A vessel of 70,000 to 119,000 DWT capacity. The largest tanker size in the AFRA (average freight rate assessment) tanker rate system.

TIME CHARTERER

The charterer has the use of the ship for a specific trip or a period of time during which he may employ her for his own account. He may direct her within the trading limits agreed in the charter-party and, in normal circumstances, the Master must obey these orders. While the time charterer has the commercial control, the owner retains responsibility for the vessel and the Master and crew remain in his employment. The hire, usually calculated per day or per deadweight metric or long ton, is paid in advance at regular, agreed intervals, normally semi-monthly or monthly. Normally, the charterer pays for the fuel on board at the time he accepts delivery and for fuel supplied while the vessel is on hire. When he hands the vessel back to the owner, the owner pays for what remains on board. The prices applicable on delivery and redelivery are the agreed bunker prices in the charter. The owner pays for the running costs of the vessel. If the ship breaks down or, as a result of the shipowner's fault, the charterer does not have the use of the vessel, the vessel goes 'off-hire' for that period subject to any terms in the charter-party. Time charterers may be owners who want to temporarily augment their own fleet; charterers who have a variety of commitments to meet; charterers who believe long-term chartering will hedge the market; operators who see a profit by taking voyage contracts from charterers and time chartering vessels themselves to cover those contracts. Where a time charterer issues and signs his own bill of lading, he may be held to be a 'carrier' for the purposes of the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971.

GENERAL PURPOSE TANKER

(GP) - a size classification of tank vessels ranging from 16,500 to 25000 DWT

GP

General Purpose Tanker - a size classification of tank vessels ranging from 16,500 to 25000 DWT

HANDY SIZE

A popular dry bulk vessel size ranging from 20000-35000 DWT used for a wide variety bulk and break bulk transportation.
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