The measurement of the depth of water.

Related Terms

HALF-TIDE BASIN

A lock of very large size and usually of irregular shape, the gates of which are kept open for several hours after high tide so that vessels may enter as long as there is sufficient depth over the sill. Vessels remain in the half-tide basin until the ensuing flood tide before they may pass through the gate to the inner harbor. If entry to the inner harbor is required before this time, water must be admitted to the half-tide basin from some external source.

HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE

The pressure at any point in a liquid at rest; equal to the depth of the liquid multiplied by its density.

IMPROVED CHANNELS

Dredged channels under the jurisdiction of the U.S Army Corps of Engineers, and maintained to provide an assigned CONTROLLING DEPTH. Symbolized on National Ocean Survey charts by black, broken lines to represent side limits, with the con- trolling depth and date of the survey given together with a tabulation of more detailed information

INLET

A narrow body of water extending into the land from a larger body of water. A long, narrow inlet with gradually decreasing depth inward is called a ria. Also called ARM, TONGUE.

INSULAR SHELF

A zone around an island that extends from the low water line to a depth at which there is usually a marked increase of slope towards oceanic depths.

FATHOMETER

A depth finder that uses sound waves to determine the depth of water.

ISOBATHIC

Having equal depth

ISTHMUS

A narrow strip of land connecting two larger portions of land. A submarine elevation joining two land areas and separating two basins or depressions by a depth less than that of the basins is called a submarine isthmus.

LEADSMAN

A sailor who takes soundings with a lead, measuring the depth of water.

ECHO SOUNDING

Measuring the depth of the water using a sonar device. See also sounding and swinging the lead.

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