A liquid giving off inflammable vapors.

Related Terms

ABSORBER

That part of the low side of an absorption system, used for absorbing vapor refrigerant.

HYDROMETER

An instrument for determining either the specific gravity of a liquid or the API gravity.

ABSORPTION

The assimilation of one material into another; in petroleum refining, the use of an absorptive liquid to selectively remove components from a process stream.

AERATION

The state of air being suspended in a liquid such as a lubricant or hydraulic fluid.

ACID CONDITION IN SYSTEM

Condition in which refrigerant or oil in a system, is mixed with vapor and fluids that are acidic in nature.

FIRE POINT

The temperature to which a combustible liquid must be heated so that the released vapor will burn continuously when ignited under specified conditions (Clevelend Open Cup).

FIRE POINT

The temperature to which a combustible liquid must be heated so that the released vapor will burn continuously when ignited under specified conditions (Clevelend Open Cup).

BARREL

A unit of liquid volume of petroleum oils equal to 42 U.S. gallons or approximately 35 Imperial gallons.

FLUID

A substance readily assuming the shape of the container in which it is placed; e.g. oil, gas, water or mixtures of these. A general classification including liquids and gases.

ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

Measures the radiation absorbed by chemically unbound atoms by analyzing the transmitted energy relative to the incident energy at each frequency. The procedure consists of diluting the fluid sample with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and directly aspirating the solution. The actual process of atomization involves reducing the solution to a fine spray, dissolving it, and finally vaporizing it with a flame. The vaporization of the metal particles depends upon their time in the flame, the flame temperature, and the composition of the flame gas. The spectrum occurs because atoms in the vapor state can absorb radiation at certain well-defined characteristic wave lengths. The wave length bands absorbed are very narrow and differ for each element. In addition, the absorption of radiant energy by electronic transitions from ground to excited state is essentially and absolute measure of the number of atoms in the flame and is, therefore, the concentration of the element in a sample.

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