The cubic capacity in 'grain'

Related Terms

CAPACITY PLAN

A plan outlining the spaces available for fuel, cargo, ballast, fresh water, etc, with guides on weight and volume for spaces at various drafts and displacements

FILTER LIFE TEST

A type of filter capacity test in which a clogging contaminant is added to the influent of a filter, under specified test conditions, to produce a given rise in pressure drop across the filter or until a specified reduction of flow is reached. Filter life may be expressed as test time required to reach terminal conditions at a specified contaminant addition rate.

DRUM

A container with a capacity of 55 U.S. gallons.

CARBONACEOUS EXCHANGER

Ion-exchange materials of limited capacity prepared by the sulfonation of coal, lignite, peat, and so on.

RESIDUAL DIRT CAPACITY

The dirt capacity remaining in a service loaded filter element after use, but before cleaning, measured under the same conditions as the dirt capacity of a new filter element.

ZEOLITE

A natural mineral (hydrous silicates) that has the capacity to absorb hardness, calcium, and magnesium ions from water.

TEU

A unit of measurement equal to the space occupied by a standard twenty foot container. Used in stating the capacity of container vessel or storage area. One 40 ft. Container is equal to two TEU's.

SHIP'S ARTICLES

A written agreement between the master of a ship and the crew concerning their employment. It includes rates of pay and capacity of each crewman, the date of commencement of the voyage and its duration.

TWENTY FOOT EQUIVALENT UNIT

A unit of measurement equal to the space occupied by a standard twenty foot container. Used in stating the capacity of container vessel or storage area. One 40 ft. Container is equal to two TEU's.

CONTAINER TERMINAL

A specialized facility where ocean container vessels dock to discharge and load containers, equipped with cranes with a safe lifting capacity of 35-40 tons, with booms having an outreach of up to 120 feet in order to reach the outside cells of vessels. Most such cranes operate on rail tracks and have articulating rail trucks on each of their four legs, enabling them to traverse along the terminal and work various bays on the vessel and for more than one crane to work a single vessel simultaneously. Most terminals have direct rail access and container storage areas, and are served by highway carriers.

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