A ship or craft designed to function as a floating barracks for housing military personnel.

Related Terms

PONTOON BRIDGE

A fixed floating bridge supported by pontoons.

LAUNCHING

The act or process of floating a ship after only hull construction is completed; in some cases ships are not launched until after all construction is completed.

ICE APRON

A wedge-shaped structure which protects a bridge pier from floating ice.

GROUNDED ICE

Floating ice which is aground in shoal water.

ICE OF LAND ORIGIN

Ice formed on land or in an ice shelf, found floating in water, including ice that is stranded or grounded

ICE ISLAND

A large piece of floating ice showing about 5 meters above the sea surface, which has broken away from an ice shelf, having a thickness of 30 to 50 meters and an area of from a few thousand square meters to l50 square nautical miles or more; usually characterized by a regularly undulating surface which gives it a ribbed appearance from the air.

ICE FRONT

The vertical cliff forming the seaward face of an ice shelf or other floating glacier varying in height from 2 to 50 meters above sea level. See also ICE WALL.

IALA MARITIME BUOYAGE SYSTEM

A buoyage which is now implemented by most maritime nations. Within the single system there are two buoyage regions, designated as Region A and Region B, where lateral marks differ only in the colors of port and starboard hand marks. In Region A, red is to port on entering; in Region B, red is to starboard on entering. The system is a combined cardinal and lateral system, and applies to all fixed and floating marks, other than lighthouses, sector lights, leading lights and marks, lightships and large navigational buoys.

ICE SHELF

A floating ice sheet attached to the coast and of considerable thickness, showing 20 to 50 meters or more above sea level. Usually of great horizontal extent and with a level or gently undulating surface, the ice shelf is augmented by annual snow accumulation and often also by the seaward extension of land glaciers. Limited areas of the ice shelf may be aground. The seaward edge is called

AFLOAT

Of a vessel which is floating freely (not aground or sunk). More generally of vessels in service

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