A particular type of tensioning lever, usually for running backstays. Their use allows the leeward backstay to be completely slackened so that the boom can be let fully out.


Related Terms

AHULL

1. lying broadside to the sea. 2. to ride out a storm with no sails and helm held to leeward.

ALEE

1. on the lee side of a ship. 2. to leeward.

LEEWARD

In the direction that the wind is blowing towards.

PAY OFF

To let a vessel's head fall off from the wind (to leeward.)

LEE HELM

The tendency of a sailboat to turn to leeward in a strong wind when there is no change in the rudder's position. This is the opposite of weather helm and is the result of a dynamically unbalanced condition.

FALL OFF

To change the direction of sail so as to point in a direction that is more down wind. To bring the bow leeward. Also bear away, bear off or head down. This is the opposite of pointing up or heading up.

LEEWARD TIDAL CURRENT

A tidal current setting in the same direction as that in which the wind is blowing. Also called LEE TIDE, LEEWARD TIDE

ANTILLES CURRENT

This current originates in the vicinity of the Leeward Islands as part of the Atlantic North Equatorial Current. It flows along the northern side of the Greater Antilles. The Antilles Current eventually joins the Florida Current (north of Grand Bahama Island) to form the Gulf Stream.

DOWNWIND

In the direction toward which the wind is blowing. The term applies particularly to the situation of moving in this direction, whether desired or not. BEFORE THE WIND implies assistance from the wind in making progress in a desired direction. LEEWARD applies to the direction toward which the wind blows, without implying motion. The opposite is UPWIND.

DIFFUSE ICE EDGE

A poorly defined ice edge limiting an area of dispersed ice. It is usually on the leeward side of an area of pack ice.

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