A long journey by ship.

Related Terms

DISABLED

A vessel damaged or impaired in such a manner as to be incapable of proceeding its voyage

LEG

A segment of a voyage between two waypoints.

BALLAST BONUS

The compensation for relatively long ballast voyage

LOADED LEG

A subdivision of a ship's voyage during which the ship is carrying cargo.

CHARTER PARTY

A contractual agreement between a ship owner and a cargo owner, usually arranged by a broker, whereby a ship is chartered (hired) either for one voyage or a period of time.

CONTRACT OF AFFREIGHTMENT

A service contract under which a ship owner agrees to transport a specified quantity of fuel products or specialty products, at a specified rate per ton, between designated loading and discharge ports. This type contract differs from a spot or consecutive voyage charter in that no particular vessel is specified.

DEVIATION

A vessel distance from specified voyage course

SHIP'S ARTICLES

A written agreement between the master of a ship and the crew concerning their employment. It includes rates of pay and capacity of each crewman, the date of commencement of the voyage and its duration.

CHART CLASSIFICATION BY SCALE

1. Charts are constructed on many different scales, ranging from about 1:2,500 to 1:14,000,000 (and even smaller for some world charts). Small-scale charts are used for voyage planning and offshore navigation. Charts of larger scale are used as the vessel approaches land. Several methods of classifying charts according to scale are in use in various nations. The follow- ing classifications of nautical charts are those used by the National Ocean Survey: Sailing charts are the smallest scale charts used for planning, fixing position at sea, and for plotting while proceeding on a long voyage. The scale is generally smaller than 1:600,000. The shoreline and topography are generalized and only offshore soundings, the principal navigational lights, outer buoys, and land- marks visible at considerable distances are shown. General charts are intended for coastwise navigation outside of outlying reefs and shoals. The scales range from about 1:150,000 to 1:600,000. Coast (coastal) charts are intended for inshore coastwise navigation where the course may lie inside outlying reefs and shoals, for entering or leaving bays and harbors of considerable width, and for navigating large inland waterways. The scales range from about 1:50,000 to 1:150,000. Harbor charts are intended for navigation and anchorage in harbors and small waterways. The scale is generally larger than 1:50,000. 2. The classification system used by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency differs from the system in definition 1 above in that the sailing charts are incorporated in the general charts classification (smaller than about 1:150,000); those coast charts especially useful for approaching more confined waters (bays, harbors) are classified as approach charts.

DEPARTURE

1. The distance between two meridians at any given parallel of latitude, expressed in linear units, usually nautical miles; the distance to the east or west made good by a craft in proceeding from one point to another. 2. The point at which reckoning of a voyage begins. It is usually established by bearings of prominent landmarks as the vessel clears a harbor and proceeds to sea. When a navigator establishes this point, he is said to take departure. Also called POINT OF DEPARTURE. 3. Act of departing or leaving. 4. The amount by which the value of a meteorological element differs from the normal value.

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