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A specialized facility where ocean container vessels dock to discharge and load containers, equipped with cranes with a safe lifting capacity of 35-40 tons, with booms having an outreach of up to 120 feet in order to reach the outside cells of vessels. Most such cranes operate on rail tracks and have articulating rail trucks on each of their four legs, enabling them to traverse along the terminal and work various bays on the vessel and for more than one crane to work a single vessel simultaneously. Most terminals have direct rail access and container storage areas, and are served by highway carriers.



Related Terms

SELF-SUSTAINING SHIP

A containership fitted with her own crane for loading and discharging containers

DDC

Abbreviation for 'Destination Delivery Charge.' A charge, based on container size, that is applied in many tariffs to cargo. This charge is considered accessorial and is added to the base ocean freight. This charge covers crane lifts off the vessel, drayage of the container within the terminal and gate fees at the terminal operation.

RUBBER-TIRED GANTRY

Traveling crane used for the movement and positioning of containers in a container field. RTG's may also be used for loading and unloading containers from rail cars.

TWENTY-FOOT EQUIVALENT UNIT

Container size standard of twenty feet. Two twenty-foot containers (TEUs) equal one FEU. Container vessel capacity and port throughput capacity are frequently referred to in TEUs.

TWENTY FOOT EQUIVALENT UNIT

A unit of measurement equal to the space occupied by a standard twenty foot container. Used in stating the capacity of container vessel or storage area. One 40 ft. Container is equal to two TEU's.

STRADDLE CARRIER

A container terminal equipment, which is motorized and runs on rubber tires. It can straddle a single row of containers and is primarily used to move containers around the terminal, but also to transport containers t

DWAT

A common measure of ship carrying capacity. The number of tons (2240 lbs.) of cargo, stores and bunkers that a vessel can transport. It is the difference between the number of tons of water a vessel displaces 'light' and the number of tons it displaces 'when submerged to the 'deep load line'.' A vessel's cargo capacity is less than its total deadweight tonnage. The difference in weight between a vessel when it is fully loaded and when it is empty (in general transportation terms, the net) measured by the water it displaces. This is the most common, and useful, measurement for shipping as it measures cargo capacity.

IN GATE

The transaction or interchange that occurs at the time a container is received by a rail terminal or water port from another carrier.

CHICKSAN

A trade name for type of movable loading arm usually made from steel pipe and mounted on a dock facility which is used in place of a hose. It can extend/retract and has some ability to swivel or pivot but when connected to a vessel, fore and aft movement of the vessel is very limited. Also known as a Hard Arm or Loading Arm.

LOADING ARM

Transfer unit between ship and shore for discharge and loading; may be articulated all-metal arms hard arms) or a combination of metal arms and hoses. Usually made from steel pipe and mounted on a dock facility or specialized vessels and which is used in place of a hose. It can extend/retract and has some ability to swivel or pivot but when connected to a vessel, fore and aft movement of the vessel or vessel(s) is very limited. Also called 'chicksans' which is one of the brand names of a popular loading arm maker.

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