The aurora in the Southern Hemisphere


Related Terms

AURORA POLARIS

A high latitude aurora borealis

AURORA

A luminous phenomenon due to electrical discharges in the atmosphere, probably confined to the thin air high above the surface of the earth It is most commonly seen in high latitudes where it is most frequent during periods of greatest sunspot activity. If it occurs in the Northern Hemisphere, it is called aurora borealis or northern lights; and if in the Southern, aurora Australis.

AURORA BOREALIS

The aurora in the Northern Hemisphere. Also called NORTHERN LIGHTS

HEMISPHERE

Half of a sphere

JUNE SOLSTICE

Summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere

ANTICYCLONE

An approximately circular portion of the atmosphere, having relatively high atmospheric pressure and winds which blow clockwise around the center in the Northern Hemisphere and counterclockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. An anticyclone is characterized by good weather.

NAVIGABLE SEMICIRCLE

The half of a cyclonic storm area in which the rotary and forward motions of the storm tend to counteract each other and the winds are in such a direction as to tend to blow a vessel away from the storm track. In the Northern Hemisphere this is to the left of the storm center and in the Southern Hemisphere it is to the right.

COCKEYED BOB

A colloquial term in western Australia for a squall, associated with thunder, on the northwest coast in Southern Hemisphere summer.

CORIOLIS FORCE

An inertial force acting on a body in motion, due to rotation of the earth, causing deflection to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. It affects air (wind), water (current), etc. and introduces an error in bubble sextant observations made from a moving craft due to the liquid in the bubble being deflected, the effect increasing with higher latitude and greater speed of the craft.

DANGEROUS SEMICIRCLE

The half of a cyclonic Storm in which the rotary and forward motions of the storm reinforce each other and the winds tend to blow a vessel into the storm track. In the Northern Hemisphere this is to the right of the storm center (when facing the direction the storm is moving) and in the Southern Hemisphere it is to the left. The opposite is the LESS DANGEROUS or NAVIGA- BLE SEMICIRCLE.

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