Ice without snow cover


Related Terms

PARTS LIST

One or more printed sheets showing a manufacturer's parts or assemblies of an end item by illustration or a numerical listing of part numbers and names; it does not outline any assembly, maintenance, or operating instructions, and it may or may not have a price list cover sheet.

MUDCAP

A quantity of wet mud, wet earth, or sand used to cover a charge of dynamite or other high explosive fired in contact with the surface of a rock in mud blasting.

INERT ATMOSPHERE

A nonreactive gas atmosphere, such as nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or helium; used to blanket reactive liquids in storage, to purge process lines and vessels of reactive gases and liquids, and to cover a reaction mix in a partially filled vessel.

END CAP

A ported or closed cover for the end of a filter element.

AZIMUTH INSTRUMENT

An instrument for measuring azimuths, particularly a device which fits over a central pivot in the glass cover of a magnetic compass.

BEARING BAR

An instrument for measuring bearings, particularly a device consisting of a slender bar with a vane at each end, and designed to fit over a central pivot in the glass cover of a magnetic compass. See also AZIMUTH BAR.

AZIMUTH BAR

An instrument for measuring azimuths, particularly a device consisting of a slender bar with a vane at each end, and designed to fit over a central pivot in the glass cover of a magnetic compass.

OBSCURATION

The designation for the sky cover when the sky is completely hidden by obscuring phenomena in contact with, or extending to the surface.

CLOUD COVER

That portion of the sky cover which is attributed to clouds, usually measured in tenths of sky covered.

CIRROSTRATUS

A principal cloud type (cloud genus), appearing as a whitish veil, usually fibrous but sometimes smooth, which may totally cover the sky, and which often produces halo phenomena, either partial or complete. Sometimes a banded aspect may appear, but the intervals between the bands are filled with thinner cloud veil. The edge of a veil of cirrostratus may be straight and clear-cut, but more often it is irregular and fringed with cirrus. Some of the ice crystals which comprise the cloud are large enough to fall, and thereby produce a fibrous aspect. Cirrostratus occasionally may be so thin and transparent as to render it nearly indiscernible, especially through haze or at night. At such times, the existence of a halo may be the only revealing feature. The angle of incidence of illumination upon a cirrostratus layer is an important consideration in evaluating the identifyin

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