The production of light by living organisms in the sea. Generally, these displays are stimulated by surface wave action, ship movement, subsurface waves, up welling, eddies, physical changes in sea water, surfs, and rip tides.

Related Terms

SKIN CONDENSER

Condenser using the outer surface of the cabinet as the heat radiating medium.

BUMPKIN

The spar projecting from stern of ship

ABRASION RESISTANCE

The ability of a material to resist surface wear.

CUTTING WEAR

Comes about when hard surface asperities or hard particles that have embedded themselves into a soft surface and plough grooves into the opposing harder surface, e.g., a journal.

ADHESIVE WEAR

Often referred to as galling, scuffing, scoring, or seizing. It happens when sliding surfaces contact one another, causing fragments to be pulled from one surface and to adhere to the other.

TRAMP FREIGHTER

A cargo ship engaged in the tramp trade.

CORDAGE

Ropes in the rigging of a ship

JOURNAL BEARING

A sliding type of bearing having either rotating or oscillatory motion and in conjunction with which a journal operates. In a full or sleeve type journal bearing, the bearing surface is 360° in extent. In a partial bearing, the bearing surface is less than 360° in extent, i.e., 150°, 120°, etc.

WEATHER SIDE

The side of a ship exposed to the wind.

CORROSION INHIBITOR

Additive for protecting lubricated metal surfaces against chemical attack by water or other contaminants. There are several types of corrosion inhibitors. Polar compounds wet the metal surface preferentially, protecting it with a film of oil. Other compounds may absorb water by incorporating it in a water-in-oil emulsion so that only the oil touches the metal surface. Another type of corrosion inhibitor combines chemically with the metal to present a non- reactive surface.

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