A lead with only one outlet



Related Terms

ASPERITIES

microscopic projections on metal surfaces resulting from normal surface-finishing processes. Interference between opposing asperities in sliding or rolling applications is a source of friction, and can lead to metal welding and scoring. Ideally, the lubricating film between two moving surfaces should be thicker than the combined height of the opposing asperities.

BABBITT

A soft, white, non-ferrous alloy bearing material composed principally of copper, antimony, tin and lead.

CATALYTIC CONVERTER

An integral part of vehicle emission control systems since 1975. Oxidizing converters remove hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) from exhaust gases, while reducing converters control nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. Both use noble metal (platinum, palladium or rhodium) catalysts that can be 'poisoned' by lead compounds in the fuel or lubricant.

LEAD NAPHTHENATE

A lead soap of naphthenic acids, the latter occurring naturally in petroleum.

PROACTIVE MAINTENANCE

A type of condition-based maintenance emphasizing the routine detection and correction of root cause conditions that would otherwise lead to failure. Such root causes as high lubricant contaminant, alignment and balance are among the most critical.

GRAPESHOT

Small balls of lead fired from a cannon, analogous to shotgun shot but on a larger scale. Similar to canister shot but with larger individual shot. Used to injure personnel and damage rigging more than to cause structural damage.

LEAD

  1. A plummet or mass of lead attached to a line, used in sounding depth at sea.
  2. In former usage, to estimate velocity in knots.
  3. The direction a mooring line takes up while being handled or when made fast.

TACKING DUELS

In sailboat racing on an upwind leg of the race course the complex manoeuvres of lead and overtaking boats to vie for the aerodynamic advantage of clear air. This results from the ongoing strategy of the lead boat's effort to keep the following boat(s) in the blanket of disturbed bad air he is creating.

VANG

  1. A rope (line) leading from gaff to either side of the deck, used to prevent the gaff from sagging.
  2. One of a pair of ropes leading from the deck to the head of a spritsail. It steadies the sprit and can control the sails performmance during a tack. The vang fall blocks are mounted slightly afore the main horse while rolling vangs are extra preventers lead forward to keep the sail to leeward in heavy weather.

THREAD LEAD

The distance thread advances in one complete turn along its axis. For a single thread the lead is equal to the pitch. For a double thread (the thread with two starts) the lead is equal to twice the pitch.

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