A glare on the underside of extensive cloud areas, created by light reflected from snow or ice-covered surfaces



Related Terms

GLARE

Dazzling brightness of the atmosphere caused by excessive reflection and scattering of light by particles in the line of sight.

LAND SKY

Dark streaks or patches or a grayness on the underside of extensive cloud areas, due to the absence of reflected light from bare ground. Land sky is not as dark as WATER SKY. The clouds above ice or snow covered surfaces have a white or yellowish white glare called ICE BLINK.

SKY MAP

The pattern on the underside of extensive cloud areas, created by the varying amounts of light reflected from the earth’s surface. Snow surfaces produce a white glare (SNOW BLINK) and ice surfaces produce a yellowish-white glare (ICE BLINK). Bare land reflects relatively little light (LAND SKY) and open water even less (WATER SKY).

SNOW BLINK

Blink caused by a snow-covered surface, which is whitish and brighter than the yellowish-white glare of ice blink.

CRIMP CONNECTER

Light duty compressible fittings used to join low voltage DC circuitry. Available in spade or barrel type male to female configurations.

ALTERNATING GROUP OCCULTING LIGHT

A group occulting light which shows periodic color change

B-B FRACTION

A mixture of butanes and butenes distilled from a solution of light liquid hydrocarbons.

ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES

Waves of associated electric and magnetic fields characterized by variations of the fields. The electric and magnetic fields are at right angles to each other and to the direction of propagation. The waves are propagated at the speed of light and are known as radio (Hertzian) waves, infrared rays, light, ultraviolet rays, X-rays, etc., depending on their frequencies.

GLOWING COMBUSTION

A reaction between oxygen or an oxidizer and the surface of a solid fuel so that there is emission of heat and light without a flame. Also known as surface burning.

FLASHING LIGHT

A navigation light in which the total duration of light in a cycle is shorter than the total duration of darkness. The term is commonly used for a SINGLE-FLASHING LIGHT, a flashing light in which a flash is regularly repeated at a rate of less then 50 flashes per minute.

Related questions

MarineProHelp 2018 - 2019.