A glare on the underside of extensive cloud areas, created by light reflected from snow or ice-covered surfaces



Related Terms

SNOW BLINK

Blink caused by a snow-covered surface, which is whitish and brighter than the yellowish-white glare of ice blink.

SKY MAP

The pattern on the underside of extensive cloud areas, created by the varying amounts of light reflected from the earth’s surface. Snow surfaces produce a white glare (SNOW BLINK) and ice surfaces produce a yellowish-white glare (ICE BLINK). Bare land reflects relatively little light (LAND SKY) and open water even less (WATER SKY).

GLARE

Dazzling brightness of the atmosphere caused by excessive reflection and scattering of light by particles in the line of sight.

LAND SKY

Dark streaks or patches or a grayness on the underside of extensive cloud areas, due to the absence of reflected light from bare ground. Land sky is not as dark as WATER SKY. The clouds above ice or snow covered surfaces have a white or yellowish white glare called ICE BLINK.

LIGHT SECTOR

As defined by bearings from seaward, the sector in which a navigational light is visible or in which it has a distinctive color different from that of adjoining sectors, or in which it is obscured. See also SECTOR LIGHT.

SHADE GLASS

A darkened transparent glass that can be moved into the line of sight of an optical instrument, such as a sextant, to reduce the intensity of light reaching the eye. Also called SHADE.

STERN LIGHT

A running light placed on the centerline of a vessel showing a continuous white light from dead astern to 67.5° to either side.

DIRECTIONAL LIGHT

A light illuminating a sector or very narrow angle and intended to mark a direction to be followed.

ANNULAR ECLIPSE

An eclipse in which a thin ring of the source of light appears around the obscuring body. Annular solar eclipses occur, but never annular lunar eclipses.

BIOLUMINESCENCE

The production of light by living organisms in the sea. Generally, these displays are stimulated by surface wave action, ship movement, subsurface waves, up welling, eddies, physical changes in sea water, surfs, and rip tides.

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