The strong, often stormy, winds from the west-north- west and northwest which blow a


Related Terms

PINCH-OFF BLADES

In blow molding, the part that compresses the parison to seal it prior to blowing, and to allow easy cooling and removal of flash.

PARISON SWELL

In blow molding, the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the pariso

INTERMITTENT BLOW DOWN

The blow down is taken from the mud drum, waterwall headers or the lowest point of circulation.

APPARENT WIND

The speed and true direction from which the wind appears to blow with reference to a moving point. Sometimes called RELATIVE WIND

ANTICYCLONE

An approximately circular portion of the atmosphere, having relatively high atmospheric pressure and winds which blow clockwise around the center in the Northern Hemisphere and counterclockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. An anticyclone is characterized by good weather.

NAVIGABLE SEMICIRCLE

The half of a cyclonic storm area in which the rotary and forward motions of the storm tend to counteract each other and the winds are in such a direction as to tend to blow a vessel away from the storm track. In the Northern Hemisphere this is to the left of the storm center and in the Southern Hemisphere it is to the right.

DANGEROUS SEMICIRCLE

The half of a cyclonic Storm in which the rotary and forward motions of the storm reinforce each other and the winds tend to blow a vessel into the storm track. In the Northern Hemisphere this is to the right of the storm center (when facing the direction the storm is moving) and in the Southern Hemisphere it is to the left. The opposite is the LESS DANGEROUS or NAVIGA- BLE SEMICIRCLE.

CYCLONE

1. A meteorological phenomena characterized by relatively low atmospheric pressure and winds which blow counterclockwise around the center in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. 2. The name by which a tropical storm having winds of 34 knots or greater is known in the South Indian Ocean.

MONSOON

A name for seasonal winds first applied to the winds over the Arabian Sea, which blow for 6 months from the northeast (northeast monsoon) and for 6 months from the southwest (southwest mon- soon). The primary cause is the much greater annual variation of temperature over large land areas compared with the neighboring ocean surfaces, causing an excess of pressure over the continents in winter and a deficit in summer, but other factors such as the relief features of the land have a considerable effect. In India the term is popularly applied chiefly to the southwest monsoon and by extension, to the rain which it brings.

COLLOID

A finely divided organic substance which tends to inhibit the formation of dense scale and results in the deposition of sludge, or causes it to remain in suspension, so that it may be blown from the boiler.

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