1. Charts are constructed on many different scales, ranging from about 1:2,500 to 1:14,000,000 (and even smaller for some world charts). Small-scale charts are used for voyage planning and offshore navigation. Charts of larger scale are used as the vessel approaches land. Several methods of classifying charts according to scale are in use in various nations. The follow- ing classifications of nautical charts are those used by the National Ocean Survey: Sailing charts are the smallest scale charts used for planning, fixing position at sea, and for plotting while proceeding on a long voyage. The scale is generally smaller than 1:600,000. The shoreline and topography are generalized and only offshore soundings, the principal navigational lights, outer buoys, and land- marks visible at considerable distances are shown. General charts are intended for coastwise navigation outside of outlying reefs and shoals. The scales range from about 1:150,000 to 1:600,000. Coast (coastal) charts are intended for inshore coastwise navigation where the course may lie inside outlying reefs and shoals, for entering or leaving bays and harbors of considerable width, and for navigating large inland waterways. The scales range from about 1:50,000 to 1:150,000. Harbor charts are intended for navigation and anchorage in harbors and small waterways. The scale is generally larger than 1:50,000. 2. The classification system used by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency differs from the system in definition 1 above in that the sailing charts are incorporated in the general charts classification (smaller than about 1:150,000); those coast charts especially useful for approaching more confined waters (bays, harbors) are classified as approach charts.

Related Terms

AFT

Back of the vessel.

ASTERN

A backward movement of a vessel

ATHWARTSHIP

Across the ship, at right angles to the fore-and-aft centerline

SAFETY CONTROL

Device to stop unit, equipment or system if unsafe pressure and/or temperatures and/or dangerous conditions are reached.

UPBOUND

A vessel traveling upstream.

AGGLOMERATION

The potential of the system for particle attraction and adhesion.

REMOTE REFRIGERATING SYSTEM

Refrigerating system in which condensing unit is away from space to be cooled.

BEAM

The width of a ship. Also called breadth.

BREADTH

The width of a ship.

AFFREIGHTMENT

A hiring of a vessel

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