1. A scheme of distinguishing and grouping clouds according to their appearance and, where possible, to their process of formation. The one in general use, based on a classification system introduced by Luke Howard in 1803, is that adopted by the World Meteorological Organization and published in the International Cloud Atlas (1956). This classification is based on the determination of (a) genera, the main characteristic forms of clouds; (b) species, the peculiarities in shape and differences in internal structure of clouds; (c) varieties, special characteristics of arrangement and transparency of clouds; (d) supplementary features and accessory clouds, appended and associated minor clouds forms; and (e) mother-clouds, the origin of clouds if formed from other clouds. The ten cloud genera are cirrus, cirrocumulus, cirrostratus, altocumulus, altostratus, nimbostratus, stratocumulus, stratus, cumulus, and cumulonimbus. The fourteen cloud species are fibratus, uncinus, spissatus, castellanus, floccus, stratiformis, nebulous, lenticularis, fractus, humilis, mediocris, congestus, calvus, and capillatus. The nine cloud varieties are intortus, vertebratus, undulatus, radiatus, lacunosis, duplicatus, translucidus, perlucidus, and opacus. The nine supplementary features and accessory clouds are inclus, mamma, virga, praecipitatio, arcus, tuba, pileus, velum, and pannus. Note that although these are Latin words, it is proper convention to use only the singular endings, e.g., more than one cirrus cloud are, collectively, cirrus, not cirri. 2. A scheme of classifying clouds according to their usual altitudes. Three classes are distinguished: high, middle, and low. High clouds include cirrus, cirrocumulus, cirrostratus, occasionally altostratus and the tops of cumulonimbus. The middle clouds are altocumulus, altostratus, nimbostratus, and portions of cumulus and cumulonimbus. The low clouds are stratocumulus, stratus, most cumulus and cumulonimbus bases, and sometimes nimbostratus. 3. A scheme of classifying clouds according to their particulate composition; namely water clouds, ice-crystal clouds, and mixed clouds. The first are compose

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SAFETY CONTROL

Device to stop unit, equipment or system if unsafe pressure and/or temperatures and/or dangerous conditions are reached.

AGGLOMERATION

The potential of the system for particle attraction and adhesion.

REMOTE REFRIGERATING SYSTEM

Refrigerating system in which condensing unit is away from space to be cooled.

FILTER ELEMENT

The porous device that performs the actual process of filtration. Also known as Cartridge

HYDROFINISHING

A process for treating raw extracted base stocks with hydrogen to saturate them for improved stability.

ACID ATTACK

Caused by an incomplete flushing after an acid cleaning process of boilers or similar equipment.

ABSORPTION

The assimilation of one material into another; in petroleum refining, the use of an absorptive liquid to selectively remove components from a process stream.

REFRIGERATING CAPACITY

The ability of a system to remove heat as compared with the cooling effect produced by melting of ice.

CORROSION INHIBITOR

Additive for protecting lubricated metal surfaces against chemical attack by water or other contaminants. There are several types of corrosion inhibitors. Polar compounds wet the metal surface preferentially, protecting it with a film of oil. Other compounds may absorb water by incorporating it in a water-in-oil emulsion so that only the oil touches the metal surface. Another type of corrosion inhibitor combines chemically with the metal to present a non- reactive surface.

CRACKING

The process whereby large molecules are broken down by the application of heat and pressure to form smaller molecules.

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