Ninety degrees minus the altitude. The term has significance only when used in connection with altitude measured from the celestial horizon, when it is synonymous with ZENITH DISTANCE

Related Terms

MOMENT OF INERTIA

The quantity obtained by multiplying the mass of each small part of a body by the square of its distance from an axis, and adding all the results.

GREENWICH HOUR ANGLE

Angular distance west of the Greenwich celestial meridian; the arc of the celestial equator, or the angle at the celestial pole, between the upper branch of the Greenwich celestial meridian and the hour circle of a point on the celestial sphere, measured westward from the Greenwich celestial meridian throug

GREENWICH HOUR ANGLE

Angular distance west of the Greenwich celestial meridian; the arc of the celestial equator, or the angle at the celestial pole, between the upper branch of the Greenwich celestial meridian and the hour circle of a point on the celestial sphere, measured westward from the Greenwich celestial meridian throug

HORIZON SYSTEM OF COORDINATES

A set of celestial coordinates based on the celestial horizon as the primary great circle; usually altitude and azimuth or azimuth angle.

HORIZON SYSTEM OF COORDINATES

A set of celestial coordinates based on the celestial horizon as the primary great circle; usually altitude and azimuth or azimuth angle.

HARPOON LOG

A log which consists of a rotator and distance registering device combined in a single unit, which is towed through the water. The TAFFRAIL LOG is similar except that the registering device is located at the taffrail, with only the rotator in the water.

HELIOCENTRIC PARALLAX

The difference in the apparent direction or positions of a celestial body outside the solar system, as observed from the earth and sun. Also called STELLAR PARALLAX, ANNUAL PARALLAX

SHEAR RATE

The difference between the velocities along the parallel faces of a fluid element divided by the distance between the faces.

HORIZON

The great circle of the celestial sphere midway between the zenith and nadir, or a line resembling or approximating such a circle. The line where earth and sky appear to meet, and the projection of this line upon the celestial sphere, is called the visible or apparent horizon. A line resembling the visible horizon but above or below it is called a false horizon. The circle of the celestial sphere-formed by the intersection of the celestial sphere and a plane perpendicular to the zenith-nadir line is called sensible horizon if the plane is through any point, such as the eye of an observer; geoidal horizon if through any sea-level point; and celestial or rational horizon if through the center of the earth. The geometrical horizon was originally considered identi- cal with the celestial horizon, but the expression is now more commonly used to refer to the intersection of the celestial

HEIGHT OF TIDE

Vertical distance from the chart sounding datum to the water surface at any stage of the tide. It is positive if the water level is higher than the chart sounding datum. The vertical distance from the chart sounding datum to a high water datum is called RISE OF TIDE.

Related questions

MarineProHelp 2018 - 2022