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The angular drawing together of the geo- graphic meridians in passing from the Equator to the poles, At the Equator all meridians are mutually parallel; passing from the Equator, they converge until they meet at the poles, intersecting at angles that are equal to their differences of longitude



Related Terms

D. LONG.

Difference of longitude - the angular distance from one meridian of longitude to another, being approximately 60 nm per degree at the equator to 0 nm at the poles.

MERIDIONAL PARTS

The length of the arc of a meridian between the equator and a given parallel on a Mercator chart, expressed in units of 1 minute of longitude at the equator.

ASTRONOMICAL LATITUDE

Angular distance between the plumb line at a station and the plane of the celestial equator It is the latitude which results directly from observations of celestial bodies, uncorrected for deflection of the vertical which, in the United States, may amount to as much as 25'. Astronomical latitude applies only t

FICTITIOUS LONGITUDE

The arc of the fictitious equator between the prime fictitious meridian and any given fictitious meridian. It may be called transverse, oblique, or grid longitude depending upon the type of fictitious meridian.

LONGITUDE OF PERICENTER

An orbital element that specifies the orientation of an orbit; it is a broken angle consisting of the angular distance in the ecliptic from the vernal equinox to the ascending node of the orbit plus the angular distance in the orbital plane from the ascend- ing node to the pericenter, i.e. the sum of the longitude of the ascending node and the argument of pericenter.

LONGITUDE OF THE ASCENDING NODE

  1. The angular distance in the ecliptic from the vernal equinox to the ascending node of the orbit. 2. The angular distance, always measured eastward, in the plane of the celestial equator from Greenwich through 360°.

COORDINATE

One of a set of magnitudes defining a point in space. If the point is known to be on a given line, only one coordinate is needed; if on a surface, two are required; if in space, three. Cartesian coordinates define a point relative to two intersecting lines, called AXES. If the axes are perpendicular, the coordinates are rectangular; if not perpendicular, they are oblique coordinates. A three- dimensional system of Cartesian coordinates is called space coordinates. Polar coordinates define a point by its distance and direction from a fixed point called the POLE. Direction is given as the angle between a reference radius vector and a radius vector to the point. If three dimensions are involved, two angles are used to locate the radius vector. Space-polar coordinates define a point on the surface of a sphere by (1) its distance from a fixed point at the center, called the POLE (2) the COLATITUDE or angle between the POLAR AXIS (a reference line through the pole) and the RADIUS VECTOR (a straight line connecting the pole and the point)- and (3) the LONGITUDE or angle between a reference plane through the polar axis and a plane through the radius vector and the polar axis. Spherical coordinates define a point on a sphere or spheroid by its angular distances from a primary great circle and from a reference secondary great circle. Geographical or terrestrial coordinates define a point on the surface of the earth. Celestial coordinates define a point on the celestial sphere. The horizon, celestial equator and the ecliptic systems of celestial coordinates are based on the celestial horizon, celestial equator, and the ecliptic, respectively, as the primary great circle.

ASTRONOMICAL LONGITUDE

Angular distance between the plane of the celestial meridian at a station and the plane of the celestial meridian at Greenwich. It is the longitude which results directly from observations of celestial bodies, uncorrected for deflection of the vertical, the prime vertical component of which, in the United States, may amount to more than 18'. Astronomical longitude applies only to positions on the earth, and i

DECLINATION

  1. Angular distance north or south of the celestial equator; the arc of an hour circle between the celestial equator and a point on the celestial sphere, measured northward or southward from the celestial equato

GRID LATITUDE

Angular distance from a grid equator

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