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The complete oxidation of all the combustible constitutes of a fuel, utilizing all the oxygen supplied.

Related Terms

ANTISTATIC ADDITIVE

An additive that increases the conductivity of a hydrocarbon fuel to hasten the dissipation of electrostatic charges during high-speed dispensing, thereby reducing the fire/ explosion hazard.

ANAEROBIC

A condition in which 'free' or dissolved oxygen is not present in the water.

CLOUD POINT

The temperature at which waxy crystals in an oil or fuel form a cloudy appearance.

CAPACITY PLAN

A plan outlining the spaces available for fuel, cargo, ballast, fresh water, etc, with guides on weight and volume for spaces at various drafts and displacements

AEROBIC

A condition in which 'free' or dissolved oxygen is present in water.

False brinelling

False brinelling of needle roller bearings is actually a fretting corrosion of the surface since the rollers are the I.D. of the bearing. Although its appearance is similar to that of brinelling, false brinelling is characterized by attrition of the steel, and the load on the bearing is less than that required to produce the resulting impression. It is the result of a combination of mechanical and chemical action that is not completely understood, and occurs when a small relative motion or vibration is accompanied by some loading, in the presence of oxygen.

FIRE POINT

The temperature to which a combustible liquid must be heated so that the released vapor will burn continuously when ignited under specified conditions (Clevelend Open Cup).

GASOHOL

A blend of 10% anhydrous ethanol (ethyl alcohol) and 90% gasoline, by volume. Used as a motor fuel.

BLOW-BY

Passage of unburned fuel and combustion gases past the piston rings of internal combustion engines, resulting in fuel dilution and contamination of the crankcase oil.

CATALYTIC CONVERTER

An integral part of vehicle emission control systems since 1975. Oxidizing converters remove hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) from exhaust gases, while reducing converters control nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. Both use noble metal (platinum, palladium or rhodium) catalysts that can be 'poisoned' by lead compounds in the fuel or lubricant.
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