The meridian used for reckoning zone time. This is generally the nearest meridian whose longitude is exactly divisible by 15°. The DAYLIGHT SAVING MERIDIAN is usually 15° east of the zone meridian.


Related Terms

HORIZONTAL GEODETIC DATUM

The basis for computations of horizontal control surveys in which the curvature of the earth is considered It consists of the astronomical and geodetic latitude and the astronom- ical and geodetic longitude of an initial point (origin); an azimuth of a line from this point; the parameters (radius and flattening) of the reference ellipsoid; and the geoidal separation at the origin. A change in any of these quantities affects every point on the datum. For this reason, while positions within a system are directly and accurately relatable, those points from different datums must be transformed to a common datum for consistency. The horizontal geodetic datum may extend over a continent or be limited to a small area.

JUTLAND CURRENT

A narrow and localized nontidal current off the coast of Denmark between longitude

CHRONOMETER

A timekeeper accurate enough to be used to determine longitude by means of celestial navigation.

LONGITUDE

The distance in degrees east or west of the meridian at Greenwich, England.

LONGITUDE FACTOR

The change in longitude along a celestial line of position per 1' change in latitude. The change in latitude for a 1' change in longitude is called LATITUDE FACTOR.

LATITUDE FACTOR

The change in latitude along a celestial line of position per 1' change in longitude. The change in longitude for a 1' change in latitude is called LONGITUDE FACTOR.

LUNAR DISTANCE

The angle, at an observer on the earth, between the moon and another celestial body. This was the basis of a method formerly used to determine longitude at sea.

ASSUMED LATITUDE

The latitude at which an observer is assumed to be located for an observation or computation, as the latitude of an assumed position or the latitude used for determining the longitude of time sight. Also called CHOSEN LATITUDE.

ASTRONOMICAL LONGITUDE

Angular distance between the plane of the celestial meridian at a station and the plane of the celestial meridian at Greenwich. It is the longitude which results directly from observations of celestial bodies, uncorrected for deflection of the vertical, the prime vertical component of which, in the United States, may amount to more than 18'. Astronomical longitude applies only to positions on the earth, and i

ASSUMED LONGITUDE

The longitude at which an observer is assumed to be located for an observation or computation, as the longitude of an assumed position or the longitude used for determining the latitude by meridian altitude. Also called CHOSEN LONGITUDE.

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