The flat part of an oar that is immersed in the water.



Related Terms

PADDLE

Any of various implements consisting of a shaft with a broad, flat blade or bladelike part at one or both ends.

STEERING BOARD

A long, flat board or oar that went from the stern to well underwater, used to steer vessels before the invention of the rudder. Traditionally on the starboard side of a ship (the 'steering board' side).

OAR

A wooden pole with a flat end, the blade, used to propel a small boat through the water.

FEATHER

1) To turn the oar blade of a rowing boat horizontally with the top forward as it comes out of the water, so to skim above the water for the return stroke. 2) To point a sail boat higher into the wind to reduce pressure from the sails in a gust.

CENTER VERTICAL KEEL

A vertical plate on the ship's centerline between the flat keel and inner bottom extending the length of the ship. Also called center vertical keel, CVK. Or center keelson.

HATCH BATTENS

Flat bars which are wedged against hatch coamings to secure tarpaulin

BILGE BRACKET

A vertical transverse flat plate welded to the tank top or margin plate and to the frame in the area of the bilge.

GAUGE GLASS

A glass-enclosed visible indicator of the water level in a boiler. Many gauge glasses are tubular, but modern high-pressure practice and railroad locomotives use two thick, flat strips of glass bolted between flanged plates, with the water and steam between the glass strips.

CENTER KEELSON

A vertical plate on the ship's centerline between the flat keel and inner bottom extending the length of the ship. Also called center vertical keel, CVK. Or center keelson.

BOILER HEADER (BOX)

A pressure part of the boiler consisting of a flat tube sheet into which the ends of the water tubes are rolled. In a parallel plane is a tube cap or handhole sheet. The two sheets are spaced about 4 to 8 in. or more apart. The top and bottom and both ends are flanged together and riveted or may be closed by a narrow flanged strip of plate riveted to each sheet. Circulating nipples connect the top of the header and drum, or the header may be flanged and riveted directly to the drum. Welding would be used today instead of rivets.

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